Thursday, November 29, 2012

Ghostly Time Travel Romance Novel Somewhere My Love Released!--Beth Trissel

If you haven't read Somewhere My Love, and even if you have, here's your chance to get the revised improved version of my award-winning paranormal romance novel for only .99 in kindleSomewhere My Love is Book One of my Somewhere In Time series. More will follow.
Fated lovers have a rare chance to reclaim the love cruelly denied them in the past, but can they grasp this brief window in time before it’s too late?
Two hundred years ago Captain Cole Wentworth, the master of an elegant Virginian home, was murdered in his chamber where his portrait still hangs. Presently the estate is a family owned museum run by Will Wentworth, a man so uncannily identical to his ancestor that spirit-sensitive tour guide Julia Morrow has trouble recognizing Cole and Will as separate. As Julia begins to remember the events of Cole’s death, she must convince Will that history is repeating, and this time he has the starring role in the tragedy. The blade is about  to fall.
“As I read Somewhere My Love, I recalled the feelings I experienced the first time I read Daphne DuMaurier’s Rebecca long ago. Using the same deliciously eerie elements similar to that gothic romance, Beth Trissel has captured the haunting dangers, thrilling suspense and innocent passions that evoke the same tingly anticipation and heartfelt romance I so enjoyed then, and still do now.”
~joysann for Publisher’s Weekly
Cover by my talented daughter Elise Trissel

Monday, November 26, 2012

Angels Among Us--Beth Trissel

When my friend, Liz, was a child and very ill she says she awoke from a fevered sleep to find an angel seated at the edge of her bed.  Its face was human-like but the features were more angular than ours and silvery.  The rest of its body was luminous and seemed neither male nor female, but she remembers the eyes, green, and the reassuring feeling of being watched over.
You may think this divine visitation was the figment of a child’s fevered mind, or you may believe that she saw an angel.  I believe.  Once when I was asleep I heard a beloved voice call my name, a voice as familiar as my mother’s or husband's and yet it was neither of them.  I think this was an angel and someday I will see and instantly recognize this being as though meeting with an old friend, and understand that he has always been with me.
Angels are messengers of God and bearers of his comfort in a hurting world.  Sometimes they even intervene in our lives and lead us to safety, though not always.  When my 16-year-old niece Kristy was killed in a car accident some people at the scene said they saw a great ray of sunshine stream down from the sky and spill over the mangled car in a kind of holy benediction.  As though God wanted us to know that he saw and was winging Kristy’s spirit up to heaven in that wonderful light, enveloped in peace that passes anything we can imagine.

Were there angels with her?  I have no doubt of it.  Still we ask why God didn’t send an angel to prevent this tragedy, and so many others.  But it seems that why is not for us to know on this side of heaven.  Anymore than we can know why our first grandbaby,  Adam, so infinitely precious, was not somehow saved, but stillborn. Though I trust with all my heart that Adam is in heaven and we will see him again.
I have no answers to these tragedies, only the promise of God’s eternal love and presence.  And I am watching for angels, tuned to the whispery touch of unseen wings and those in human form.  God uses people, particularly those who have known grief, to minister to others.  If your heart seeks the light, you are never really alone.  If you yearn for comfort, keep watch, angels will come to you.  Remember, they can look like anybody, be anybody, young or old, can even be you, as you minister to others.
Hebrews 13:2, "Be not forgetful to entertain strangers: for thereby some have entertained angels unawares."

Sunday, November 25, 2012

For Lovers of Ghostly Christmas Romance--Beth Trissel

Somewhere the Bells Ring is on sale for .99 in kindle and nookbook through the end of December, so get one for yourself and your friends and relations. Everybody needs at least two. Well, maybe not that many, but you get the idea. The ghost is intriguing, the story a compelling mystery, not horror, and Somewhere the Bells Ring is a hauntingly beautiful romance, so a perfect read for most anybody.  But don't take my word for it. 

From Fallen Angel Reviews: 
"Somewhere The Bells Ring is a haunting but strangely comforting read, focusing on timeless romance rather than spooky or scary scenes. The author is extremely talented at creating vivid scenes; her intricate descriptions leave the reader with vivid images and a strong sense of time and place. I would recommend this novel to anyone looking for an intriguing, gripping ghost story with a focus on romance rather than terror." Reviewed by: Stephanie E
And, she gave it five angels. Thanks Stephanie

Saturday, November 24, 2012

Glimpse Into Historical Romance Novel Kira, Daughter of the Moon--Beth Trissel

‘A beautiful Scots-Irish healer in the rugged Alleghenies finds herself accused of witchcraft. With the terror of the French and Indian War fresh in her mind, can Kira love a white warrior?’
God help her, she could die of mortification. And oh, was he handsome. What Kira could see of him anyway. She felt miles above the forest floor. Even that wasn’t distant enough, though, as he smiled up at her and the spectacle she’d made of herself.  Why had she worn crimson today? She should’ve donned her mud-colored petticoats and blended in better, or run in the first place––
“Hullo there!” His call disrupted her internal tirade.
Ebenezer chose that particular moment to land on what he could reach of her shoulder and answered, “Hullo!”
The man chuckled. “Another defender?”
Kira nodded, all she could manage in her awkward state.
“Have you others?”
She lifted her chin––sort of––and blew a dark strand of hair from her eyes. “Not at hand.”
He cocked his head to one side. “Pardon my intrusion, Miss, but you seem in want of aid.”
Refusing any acknowledgement of her situation, she said, “No. Just resting,” as if clinging to the tree in this absurd manner were a common occurrence.
“Indeed? I could swear you were stuck up there.”
“I’m quite comfortable.”
“Ah. Would you like me to go, then?”
Heartily.  She felt an utter fool.
“Very well. I shall bid you good day.” Giving a cheery wave, the frontiersman turned and started down the ferny path.
Returning the gesture was impossible; she didn’t dare move.  It occurred to her, rather strongly, that perhaps on this particular occasion it might be best to pocket her pride. Not readily done, but Kira called after him, “Wait!”~
***Available in print and eBook from The Wild Rose Press,  Amazon, at Barnes & Noble in Nookbook, from All Romance eBooks, and other online booksellers.
Although written to stand alone, Kira, Daughter of the Moon is the sequel to my award-winning historical romance novel Through the Fire.

Friday, November 23, 2012

Rosemary and Herbal Lore--Beth Trissel

“There’s rosemary that’s for remembrance. Pray, you love, remember.” ~ Hamlet

Rosemary is one of my favorite herbs, mostly just because. I rarely cook with it, but love its scent and the wealth of history behind it. Known as the herb of remembrance from the time of ancient Greece, it appears in that immoral verse by Shakespeare.  My fascination with herbs plays a significant role in my historical/light paranormal romance Somewhere My Love, as does Hamlet, for that matter.  I always wanted to write a murder mystery with a focus on herbs and parallels to a Shakespearean play, and so I did.
A Modern Herbal by Maud Grieve, a wonderful source of herbal lore as well as practical information on the medicinal uses and growing requirements for a myriad of plants, is an invaluable guide. I have volumes one and two of Ms. Grieve’s work and can easily lose myself in their pages.  She refers to her herbal as modern, and in comparison to the ancient herbalists it is, but A Modern Herbal is charmingly quaint and published in the early 20th century.
Regarding Rosemary, she says,
The Ancients were well acquainted with the shrub, which had a reputation for strengthening the memory. On this account it became the emblem of fidelity for lovers. It holds a special position among herbs from the symbolism attached to it. Not only was it used at weddings, but also at funerals, for decking churches and banqueting halls at festivals, as incense in religious ceremonies, and in magical spells.
At weddings, it was entwined in the wreath worn by the bride, being first dipped into scented water. Anne of Cleves, we are told, wore such a wreath at her wedding. A Rosemary branch, richly gilded and tied with silken ribands of all colours, was also presented to wedding guests, as a symbol of love and loyalty. Together with an orange stuck with cloves it was given as a New Year‘s gift…
In early times, Rosemary was freely cultivated in kitchen gardens and came to represent the dominant influence of the house mistress ‘Where Rosemary flourished, the woman ruled.’
The Treasury of Botany says:
‘There is a vulgar belief in Gloucestershire and other counties, that Rosemary will not grow well unless where the mistress is “master”; and so touchy are some of the lords of creation upon this point, that we have more than once had reason to suspect them of privately injuring a growing rosemary in order to destroy this evidence of their want of authority.’
Rosemary was one of the cordial herbs used to flavour ale and wine. It was also used in Christmas decoration.
“Down with the rosemary and so,
Down with the baies and mistletoe,
Down with the holly, ivie all
Wherewith ye deck the Christmas Hall.”

Rosemary Christmas Trees
Although an herb, rosemary is often shaped into lovely miniature Christmas trees. The plant is well suited for this purpose as its essential oils produce a scent similar to pine trees and it has a natural evergreen shape and needle-like leaves.
If you purchase a rosemary plant whether as a Christmas tree or for your indoor herb garden, remember it needs good light and moderate watering. Allow the soil to dry before re-watering to avoid root rot. The most common cause of death for potted rosemary is over watering. In spring transfer your rosemary to a clay pot. The clay will help wick excess water out of the soil. Fertilize monthly to maintain health. To this advice I add that you can also kill them by allowing the plant to dry out, so don’t do that either.
Because rosemary is native to the hot, dry hills of the Mediterranean, growing it indoors can be a problem. You may find you get more dense vigorous growth if it is kept outside during most of the year. Trim the plant periodically to preserve the Christmas tree shape.

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Save Thanksgiving from Commercialism--Beth Trissel

"There is one day that is ours. Thanksgiving Day is the one day that is purely American."
~O. Henry 

With a daughter working in retail at a major store, and fellow employees now referring to Thanksgiving as 'Gray Thursday', she and I have pondered what should be--used to be--the focus of America's time-honored holiday. What does Thanksgiving mean to you? I've gathered some fitting quotes and reflections on this historic day.

"O Lord that lends me life,
Lend me a heart replete with thankfulness."
~William Shakespeare

"On Thanksgiving Day we acknowledge our dependence."  ~William Jennings Bryan

"Give thanks for unknown blessings already on their way."  ~Native American Saying

"An optimist is a person who starts a new diet on Thanksgiving Day."  ~Irv Kupcinet

"Gratitude is the inward feeling of kindness received. Thankfulness is the natural impulse to express that feeling. Thanksgiving is the following of that impulse."
~Henry Van Dyke 

"If the only prayer you said in your whole life was, "thank you," that would suffice."
  ~Meister Eckhart

"Thanksgiving Day is a jewel, to set in the hearts of honest men; but be careful that you do not take the day, and leave out the gratitude."  ~E.P. Powell

"Thanksgiving Day comes, by statute, once a year; to the honest man it comes as frequently as the heart of gratitude will allow."  ~Edward Sandford Martin

"He who thanks but with the lips
Thanks but in part;
The full, the true Thanksgiving
Comes from the heart."
~J.A. Shedd

"Thanksgiving dinners take eighteen hours to prepare.  They are consumed in twelve minutes.  Half-times take twelve minutes.  This is not coincidence."  ~Erma Bombeck

"None is more impoverished than the one who has no gratitude.  Gratitude is a currency that we can mint for ourselves, and spend without fear of bankruptcy." ~Fred De Witt Van Amburgh

"Ah! on Thanksgiving day....
When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more,
And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before.
What moistens the lips and what brightens the eye?
What calls back the past, like the rich pumpkin pie?"
~John Greenleaf Whittier

"We can only be said to be alive in those moments when our hearts are conscious of our treasures."  ~Thornton Wilder

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

The Site of the First True Thanksgiving--Beth Trissel

While doing research for the sequel to my historical romance novel Enemy of the King (postponed after the idea for Somewhere My Love came to me) my mother and I toured several of the lovely old James River plantations.  Two of these, Berkeley and Shirley, most influenced the home in Somewhere My Love, ‘Foxleigh.’  While visiting Berkeley, originally called Berkeley Hundred and named after one of its founders, I was especially impressed by the wealth of history behind this beautiful home and stately grounds. That sense of the past just flowed over me, and I particularly remember a kind and informative guide, an older woman. But there were others.

The magnificent terraced boxwood gardens and lawn extend a quarter-mile from the front door to the James River.  The mansion itself wasn’t built until 1726, but the plantation’s history reaches much farther back into America‘s roots. I didn’t know that Berkeley was the actual site of the first Thanksgiving in America on Dec. 4th, 1619.  Most of you probably don't either. (*Image from Williamsburg Weekends)

On December 4, 1619, a group of 38 English settlers arrived at Berkeley Hundred about 8,000 acres on the north bank of the James River near Herring Creek in an area then known as Charles Cittie. It was about 20 miles upstream from Jamestown, where the first permanent settlement of the Colony of Virginia was established on May 14, 1607. The group’s charter required that the day of arrival be observed yearly as a “day of thanksgiving” to God. On that first day, Captain John Woodleaf held the service of thanksgiving.
During the Indian Massacre of 1622 nine of the settlers at Berkeley Hundred were killed, as well as about a third of the entire population of the Virginia Colony. The Berkeley Hundred site and other outlying locations were abandoned as the colonists withdrew to Jamestown and other more secure points.  After several years, the site became Berkeley Plantation and was long the traditional home of the Harrison family, one of the First Families of Virginia.

(*Image from Berkeley Plantation First Thanksgiving Festival)
Benjamin Harrison, son of the builder of Berkeley and the plantation’s second owner, was a signer of the Declaration of Independence and three-time Governor of Virginia. William Henry Harrison, Benjamin‘s third son, born at Berkeley, was the famous Indian fighter known as “Tippecanoe,” who later became the ninth President of the United States, in 1841. His grandson, Benjamin Harrison, was the 23rd President.
Many famous founding fathers and mothers were guests at this gracious and elegant estate.   For more on Berkeley Plantation and a fascinating glimpse into early America visit:

Monday, November 19, 2012

The True Story Behind Historical Paranormal Romance Novel The Bearwalker's Daughter--Beth Trissel

The Bearwalker's Daughter is a historical romance novel interwoven with an intriguing paranormal thread, set among the clannish Scots in the mist-shrouded Alleghenies. The story is similar to others of mine with a colonial frontier flavor and also features Native American characters. My passion for the past, and some of the accounts I've come across while researching my early American ancestors and the Shawnee Indians, is at the heart of my inspiration.
A particularly tragic account is the driving force behind this story, one I discovered while researching my early American  ancestors, the ill-fated romance of  a captive woman who fell in love with the son of a chief. As the result of a treaty, she was taken from her warrior husband and forced back to her white family where she gave birth to a girl. Then the young woman’s husband did the unthinkable and left the tribe to go live among the whites, but such was their hatred of Indians that before he reached his beloved her brothers killed him. Inconsolable and weak from the birth, she grieved herself to death.
Heart-wrenching, that tale haunts me to this day. And I wondered, was there some way those young lovers could have been spared such anguish, and what happened to their infant daughter when she grew up?

Not only did The Bearwalker's Daughter spring from that sad account, but it also had a profound influence on my historical romance Red Bird's Song.  Now that I've threaded it through two novels, perhaps I can let go...Perhaps....

I put my heart into writing The Bearwalker's Daughter, was even more deeply invested in historical romance novel Red Bird's Song, and poured my soul into my historical romance novel Through the Fire.  And more recently, my latest release, historical romance novel Kira, Daughter of the Moon. The history these novels draw from is raw, real, drama filled, and pounds with adventure.  A passionate era where only the strong survive.  Superstition ran high among both the Scots settlers and Native Americans, and far more--vision that transcends what is to reach what can be.  We think we have gained much in our modern era, and so we have.  But we've also lost.  In my writing, I try to recapture what shouldn't be forgotten.  Read and judge for yourself.

Blurb for The Bearwalker's Daughter:

Timid by nature—or so she thinks—Karin McNeal hasn’t grasped who she really is or her fierce birthright. A tragic secret from the past haunts the young Scots-Irish woman longing to learn more of her mother's death and the mysterious father no one will name. The elusive voices she hears in the wind hint at the dramatic changes soon to unfold in the mist-shrouded Alleghenies in Autumn, 1784.

Jack McCray, the wounded stranger who staggers through the door on the eve of her twentieth birthday and anniversary of her mother's death, holds the key to unlock the past. Will Karin let this handsome frontiersman lead her to the truth and into his arms, or seek the shelter of her fiercely possessive kinsmen? Is it only her imagination or does someone, or something, wait beyond the brooding ridges—for her?

"Ms. Trissel's alluring style of writing invites the reader into a world of fantasy and makes it so believable it is spellbinding." --Long and Short Reviews

*The Bearwalker's Daughter is available at Amazon for .99
*The Bearwalker's Daughter is a revised version of Daughter of the Wind.
*Cover by my talented daughter Elise Trissel
*Image of old family musket, powder horn, and shot pouch by my mom Pat Churchman

Saturday, November 17, 2012

Goodreads Giveaway for Historical Romance Novel, Kira Daughter of the Moon–Beth Trissel

I probably should have mentioned this earlier, but it’s not too late to pop into Goodreads and enter the giveaway for a signed copy of my new historical romance novel, Kira, Daughter of the Moon. I am giving away three copies at: Goodreads.
(Contest runs through Nov. 21st)
Blurb: Logan McCutcheon returns to colonial Virginia after seven years in the hands of Shawnee Indians. But was he really a captive, as everybody thinks? He looks and fights like a warrior, and seems eager to return to those he calls friends and family.
Kira McClure has waited for Logan all those years, passing herself off as odd to keep suitors at bay–and anyone else from getting too close. Now that he’s back, he seems to be the only person capable of protecting her from the advances of Josiah Campbell and accusations of witchcraft. And to defend the settlers against a well-organized band of murderous thieves.~
***Kira, Daughter of the Moon is available in print and various ebook formats from The Wild Rose Press,  Amazon, Barnes & Noble in NookbookAll Romance eBooks, and other online booksellers.
Although written to stand alone, ‘Kira’ is the sequel to my award-winning historical romance novel Through the Fire. 

Friday, November 16, 2012

Short Historical Romance The Lady and the Warrior--Beth Trissel

“The Lady and The Warrior is a very short story that is a pleasure to read. Beth Trissel transports us into a special world with her descriptions, well-rounded characters and delightful writing.” ~Amazon Reviewer Reader Forever
ExcerptMay, 1783, the Virginia Frontier, the Allegheny Mountains
That terrified cry came from the stream.  Zane didn’t have much time to reach her.  And he was so close!
He slid the musket strap from his shoulder.  Grasping the long firearm, he raced over the misty path.  Like a buck taking flight, he dodged stones and sprang over fallen limbs.  He skirted an enormous downed trunk capped with toadstools.  Shouldering the musket again, he pushed through the underbrush.
Branches snagged his brown hunting shirt.  Briars snatched at his leather breeches and wool leggings.  He tore free.  A tangle of vines lay between him and the woman.  Taking the tomahawk slung at his side, he chopped his way through.  Chest pounding, he arrived at the engorged stream.
With eyes honed to detect the barest hint of man or beast, he scanned the swift current.  Woodland debris bobbed in the brown flood.  No woman.  She must be farther downstream.
He sprinted along the edge of the bank.  Whoever this unfortunate female was, she was about to drown.  Even without knowing her, it goaded him.  And the urge to save her swelled inside like the muddy water overflowing its banks.
There!  Zane spotted the young woman clinging to a branch as the torrent did its damnedest to rip her away.
“Hold on!  I’m coming!”
Her head swiveled toward him, face white with fear and fatigue.
“Hold on!”
She managed the barest nod.
He laid his musket on the ground.   Wedging his moccasins against the stones and roots, he sidestepped down the slick earth.  Then reached out and grasped the branch she held to—testing its strength.  The wood was firm beneath his hand.
So far, so good.
He leaned over the swirling water.  Careful.  One misstep and they’d both be swept away to a watery grave.
Desperate eyes met his, the hue of summer leaves and marbled with brown like the forest.   Her fingers slipped.
Quick!   He snagged her shoulder, digging in his fingers so her cloak wouldn’t come away in his hand.  “I’ve got you!”
She clutched at him.
“Don’t!  You’ll pull us both in!”
A look of misgiving flitted through her panicked gaze.
“Trust me.  I’ll not you let go.”
The Lady and the Warrior is .99 at Amazon. This short historical with a The Last of the Mohican’s flavor gives a taste of my long historicals.  If you like it, chances are you will enjoy them too.
***Images of stream and old family musket, powder horn, and hunting pouch by my mom, Pat Churchman. Cover by daughter Elise

Thursday, November 15, 2012

Everything Changes When A ghost Requests Her Help--Beth Trissel

Fascinated by ghosts, who me? Well, a bit, I confess.  Thus the reason they appear here and there in various of my books.  A standout ghost stars in  my vintage American Christmas Romance Somewhere the Bells Ring.
The ghosts in my stories do not always take the same form, though. Some are sensed and seen only in the character’s mind.  Or in dreams.  One is a violent poltergeist.  Some are old loves…
In Somewhere the Bells Ring, the ghost seems perfectly real and when Bailey is with him, she’s transported back from 1968 to 1918 and the end of World War One in the same old house.
This is my favorite sort of ghost.  Some of the most intriguing stories I’ve ever come across involve ghosts who appear quite solid, not at all vaporous, and give the person seeing them a glimpse of the past as though through a window in time.  And who’s to say that isn’t what’s happening?  Maybe a ripple opens up and allows a glimpse of what once was and those who lived in that time and place?
Can they see us in turn?  Maybe so.  And can there be communion with these corporeal spirits from the past?  Possibly.  That’s the premise for this story.
“When I see ghosts they look perfectly real and solid — like a living human being. They are not misty; I can’t see through them; they don’t wear sheets or bloody mummy bandages. They don’t have their heads tucked under their arms. They just look like ordinary people, in living color, and sometimes it is hard to tell who is a ghost.” ~Chris Woodyard
“I have thought that I have seen ghosts on many occasions.” Taylor Caldwell
“With true love as it is with ghosts; everyone talks about it, but few have seen it.”   ~Francois de La Rochefoucauld
“I fell in love with Ms. Trissel’s characters and look forward to the next delightful story ready with Kleenex box in hand. A must read for every romance fan.”~ Robin at Romancing the Book Reviews for Somewhere the Bells Ring
Somewhere the Bells Ring is a haunting story of timeless love, and of course, it’s true.
Blurb: Caught with pot in her dorm room, Bailey Randolph is exiled to a relative’s ancestral home in Virginia to straighten herself out. Banishment to Maple Hill is dismal, until a ghost appears requesting her help. Bailey is frightened but intrigued. Then her girlhood crush, Eric Burke, arrives and suddenly Maple Hill isn’t so bad.
To Eric, wounded in Vietnam, his military career shattered, this homecoming feels no less like exile. But when he finds Bailey at Maple Hill, her fairy-like beauty gives him reason to hope–until she tells him about the ghost haunting the house. Then he wonders if her one experiment with pot has made her crazy.
As Bailey and Eric draw closer, he agrees to help her find a long-forgotten Christmas gift the ghost wants. But will the magic of Christmas be enough to make Eric believe–in Bailey and the ghost–before the Christmas bells ring?
*An old photograph of the Virginia family home place the house in Somewhere the Bells Ring is based on.
***Somewhere the Bells Ring is available in various eBook formats from The Wild Rose PressAmazon KindleAll Romance Ebooks, Barnes & Noble’s Nookbook and other online booksellers.